Sunday, December 28, 2014

Don't Toss That Used Motor Oil!



Used motor oil should be re-refined and recycled to cut back on crude oil demand and protect local waterways.

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Monday, December 22, 2014

Diesel VS Gas Engines


Whether you're thinking about buying a diesel car or truck or becoming a diesel mechanic or simply would like to compare a diesel powered vehicle to a more conventional unleaded gasoline powered vehicle, there are a few things you need to bear in mind and understand. Each type of engine has its own advantages and drawbacks, so knowing what you need and how you need it for your personalized lifestyle is really important.

Today's diesel engines are certainly not what they have been 10 or even five years back. Gone are the days of pungent exhaust and unacceptably obnoxious engine sound. Diesel engines have become much cleaner, have more power and are considerably more dependable. These are some of the reasons that we are seeing more and more ordinary automobiles with diesel engines rather than the traditional gasoline engine.

Let's take a look at various differences between these two engine types.

Are the Engines of Diesel Trucks and Cars Better?

Theoretically, a diesel truck engine is quite similar to the engine of a truck powered by gas. They are both internal combustion engines that are designed to transform one type of energy to another type of energy. This energy then results in linear motion, which then causes forward motion to take place. The major difference is how the combustion takes place. A gas truck engine has fuel combustion come about thanks to sparks from spark plugs. A diesel truck engine has the fuel combustion take place from the heat of the pressurized air within the engine.

Safety of the Engine

As any diesel mechanic will tell you, although you can flame diesel fuel in the open air using merely a wick, it is significantly less explosive than gas and does not develop a flammable vapor. That means a diesel engine won't ever vapor lock. Moreover, a diesel mechanic will tell you that the engines in diesel trucks will be more efficient because of their fuel efficiency, which is practically constant as compared to the sporadic nature of a gasoline engine which often can use more fuel to get less power.

Engine Performance

As any diesel mechanic will explain, what makes a car so appealing is its ability to accelerate swiftly. For that reason, we need to evaluate the performance difference between both engine types. Because engines in diesel trucks and cars are focused on torque as opposed to horsepower, they'll run more efficiently but accelerate fairly slowly in comparison. For many automobile owners, that lack of acceleration is unsatisfactory. For motorists who are looking to use their car or truck for pulling heavy loads such as campers or boats, a diesel engine makes more sense.

Efficiency of the Engine

When you compare a diesel engine to a gasoline engine, we cannot overlook the efficiency between both engines. If you are looking for an engine that's going to be used long-term, then a diesel engine is going to be best for your needs because you will save money over the lifespan of the engine. With 20 - 30% less fuel consumption, the savings really can add up. Diesel engines also have a longer lifespan than their gasoline counterparts. A typical diesel engine lasts around 350,000 miles before needing an overhaul, the gasoline counterpart is good for about 120,000 miles. Should you be looking for short term benefits, however, then a gasoline engine will likely be for you since it will take a few years for a gasoline engine to be less cost effective overall than a diesel engine.

Ultimately the environmental advantage of using a diesel engine is what shifts the debate in favor of using it primarily. The engines of diesel trucks and automobiles produce only a minimal quantity of carbon monoxide, so minimal, actually, that they can be used underground. Less carbon monoxide impact on our atmosphere means a healthier planet, and that's something we should all be striving toward.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6788465

Friday, December 19, 2014

Services We Offer


Auto Repair

Air Conditioning and Heating
Cooling System
Alignments
Brakes
Muffler & Exhaust
Emissions
Smog Test and Repair
Clutch Repair
Axles & CV Joints
Ignition & Starter
Batteries
Alternator
Electrical Diagnosis
Electronic System Diagnosis
Fuel System
Safety Checks
Inspections
Tune-up
Pre-purchase evaluations 




Oil Changes
Lube Service
Shocks And Struts
Suspension Repair
Diesel Engines
Engine Repair
Engine Controls
Radiator Repair
Imports and Domestic
Flex Fuel Vehicles
Hybrids
Belts
Air Filters
Hose Replacement
Timing Belt
Light Bulb Replacement
Cabin Air Filters
Spark Plugs
Windshield
Transmissions





12/12 Warranty on Parts and Labor Computerized Service History for each Vehicle ASE Master, and Factory Trained Technicians, to Repair Your Vehicle Quickly and Effectively Latest and Most Advanced Diagnostic Equipment Oil Change reminders

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Monday, December 8, 2014

When Should Engine Oil Be Replaced

For years, car makers have preached the gospel that engine oil needs to be changed every 3 months or 3 thousand miles, whichever comes first. This was because engine oil formulations from decades back degraded and broke down when left in the crankcase for longer than the prescribed interval. Heat, friction, and oil oxidation resulted in a particulate-filled and muddy mixture known as sludge. Sludge kills engines by gumming up oil passages and contaminating good oil. It can crystalize and harden from engine heat resulting in formations that cannot be removed except by an engine teardown. Sludge deposits can be prevented by using high quality engine oils, which will prolong engine life.
Modern vehicle engines operate at high heat and close tolerances. One of the reason for this is the Federal Emissions requirements that imposes fines and sanctions if minimum tailpipe emission controls are not met. One of the steps car makers have taken to meet these requirements is to increase combustion chamber temperatures with higher compression engines, running leaner fuel systems, adjusting ignition timing for optimum emissions, narrowing cooling system water jackets, and tightening engine oil tolerances. All this steps result in hotter running engines that emit less tailpipe emissions. However, these tighter tolerances put increased demands on engine lubricants and inferior formulations will allow the oil to break down more easily, thus promoting sludge buildup.
New research, development and cooperation between car makers and lubricant producing companies has resulted in improved engine lubricants that meet the requirements of today's higher performing engines and at the same time delay the onset of sludge buildup. This means that with modern high quality oils such as synthetics, oil changes can be extended to more than the traditional 3 months or 3,000 kilometers. In fact, the best synthetic oils used to flaunt 10,000 km changes but probably because of warranty and legal concerns, this extended change interval has ceased to be advertised.
Several manufacturers now boast of oil monitoring technologies to help extend oil change intervals. Oil monitoring systems look at crankcase temperatures, moisture, and combustion chamber events while the engine is in operation. The best systems can measure the serviceable life of a car's engine oil to within 10%. The result of the adoption of these technologies is that with normal vehicles use, many manufacturer had adopted a new recommended figure of 7,500 miles between oil changes. This presumes of course that the car owner will use the engine oil recommended by the car maker. To be on the safe side, DIY owners would be better off adopting a 5,000 mile oil change interval.
As with other technological breakthroughs, engine oils are much better nowadays and engines are much better protected, specially if synthetic oils are used. The owner must also remember to always use a good quality filter when having the engine oil changed. The filter is the storehouse for dirt in the engine and an old filter will allow dirt and grit to circulate within and on the engine bearing surfaces and virtually all metal mating surfaces. These will be damaged by the sandpaper action of circulating grit, resulting in wider oil tolerances, lowered oil pressure and ultimately premature engine failure.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5867117

Friday, December 5, 2014

How To Properly Care For And Maintain Your Windshield Wipers

Most of us take for granted many of the wonderful technologies that we have today. One example would be the windshield wipers. Can you imagine not having windshield wipers? Even after the windshield wiper was invented in 1903 it was not electric. Instead, the driver had to reach out the window and do it by hand. This could be kind of tricky and dangerous to do while driving down the road. In 1910, the windshield wiper became a standard item on cars, but was still not made electric for years.
Even though the windshield wiper is a great feature to have, they can still be irritating. It's amazing how often windshield wipers need to be replaced. This great little invention seems to wear out quite quickly. The rubber wears quickly causing the blade to not properly clear the windshield. Of course the one spot that seems to quit working first is right in the driver's line of vision. For most people this is quite irritating, and causes a trip to the store for a new set. Here are a few things that will shorten the life of your windshield wipers and have you making the trip even more often.
One cause of quick wear on windshield wipers is when they are used to remove hard snow. How many of us get in the car in the morning, start it, and turn on the windshield wipers? I know that I've been guilty of this one. You don't have time to start the car, or clear the windshield properly, so you just use the wipers. This may clear your windshield for you, but it is hard on your wiper blades. The blades are just rubber and using them to scrape the hard snow off the windshield can cause them to become deformed.
Another cause of quick wear would be trying to use your wiper blades to scrape the ice off the windshield. When it's that cold outside who wants to stand outside and scrape the ice off their windshield? It can be especially damaging if you just squirt a little windshield washer fluid on the windshield to get the ice wet, and then use the wiper blades to scrape it off. This little trick seems to work pretty good, and quickly too. The problem with this is it will also cause your wiper blades to become deformed and not work properly.
Winter is not the only time your windshield wipers may become damaged. Some people use their windshield wipers to get dirt or sticks or other debris off their windshield without using the windshield washer fluid. Using your wiper blades on the dry glass is not good for them. If you need to get debris off your windshield you should use the windshield washer fluid first so that the blades can move easier. The fluid allows the blades to glide smoothly across the windshield instead of scraping and making that horrible noise they make when it's dry.
When your windshield wiper blades start to chatter when you use them, or start to leave streaks you may want to invest in a new set. Just remember what causes extra wear on your windshield wiper blades, and try to avoid doing it.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/302888

Friday, November 28, 2014

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Peace Of Mind Warranty



All NAPA AutoCare Center locations are locally owned and operated. NAPA AutoCare is not a franchise, but a high standard in the automotive industry developed by NAPA more than 20 years ago. Because it meets or exceeds NAPA's high standards - and has an outstanding reputation in your community - your local NAPA AutoCare Center can offer exclusive benefits like the NAPA AutoCare Peace of Mind Warranty to its customers.
What are the benefits to you?
 
  • Included FREE with your qualifying repair or service work.
  • Covers parts and labor on qualifying* repairs and services for 12 months/12,000 miles.
  • That doubles to 24 months/24,000 miles if you use your NAPA AutoCare EasyPay Credit Card (applications available at participating locations).
  • Honored nationwide by thousands of NAPA AutoCare Centers, so you're protected even when you travel

Mechanical Warranty Phone Number: 1-800-452-6272
Collision Warranty Phone Number: 1-800-452-6272
Truck (Heavy Duty) Warranty Phone Number: 1-888-925-5428


* Click here for details on the Peace of Mind Warranty and covered services and repairs

Saturday, November 15, 2014

How to Take Proper Care of Your Transmission

You probably already know that the automatic transmission of your car is one of the most critical components that keeps your vehicle moving forward. And something as intricate as that needs proper maintenance in order for it to keep going for the long haul. Automatic transmissions are a little more complex than its manual counterparts so it needs a little more care than one might expect.
As you should already know automatics rely heavily on transmission fluid in order to keep it running strong. The fluid is critical in that it lubricates and cools the many various components that lie within your vehicle and it is important to maintain that fluid at a reasonable consistency. Old, dirty fluid can cause a number of problems including slipping gears, loss of acceleration, and of course failure. The last thing you want to have is a transmission failure that can cost a whole heap of money to repair let alone replace. The biggest reason why transmissions fail or develop problems is because owners forget to maintain it on a regular basis.
Heat is your worst enemy. Heat is the main cause for short car lifespans and I will explain why. Transmissions rely on fluid to keep it running smoothly. As I have said fluid is what lubricates and cools the many parts in your car. The harder your transmission works the more heat it produces and the more heat it is exposed to causes it to eventually develop problems. When fluid temperatures rise above 215 degrees Fahrenheit varnish forms; higher and seals harden, plates slip, seals and plates burn out, and carbon forms. If fluid temperature rises above 315 degrees Fahrenheit than expect your car to last less than 800 miles. If kept at 175 degrees Fahrenheit than your car will be able to drive over 100,000 miles. See how much difference that makes? Even a 20 degree drop from 220 to 200 degrees in fluid temperature can double the lifespan of your transmission! So of course this is why fluid is critical to the health of your transmission.
Probably one of the most common and most effective ways in prolonging your transmission is by getting a fluid change as recommended by the car manufacturer. Most automotive experts suggest getting a fluid change every 30,000 miles or 2 years, whichever comes first. It really all depends on your driving habits and the type of fluid used though. A fluid change can be done by yourself but it is recommended that you take it into a repair shop where the technicians are knowledgeable in car maintenance. The service is quite simple and consists of dropping the pan to remove the old fluid as well as to inspect for contaminants. The filter gets changed accordingly and fluid is then added to the proper levels. The main reason why you want to bring it into a repair shop is because the technicians will know if there is a problem with the transmission by looking at the old fluid. However a fluid change does not insure that ALL of the old fluid is removed. A lot of fluid can still remain in cooler lines and the torque converter which is why the next method explained is generally a better option.
Another common car maintenance routine is to get a transmission flush. A transmission flush is where all the fluid is removed and the system gets thoroughly cleaned. The process involves connecting a pump to the cooler lines to remove all the old fluid. New fluid is then replaced at the same time so that the old fluid is not able to contaminate the new fluid. A flush is much more effective than a change because ALL of the old fluid is replaced. This allows the new fluid to do a much better job at cooling and lubricating the transmission. Costs for a flush can run a little higher than a fluid change but many say it is well worth it for how much it helps to extend the life of the tranny.
If you are not sure how long or how many miles it has been since you have had a fluid change or a flush then a good way to know when to get your car serviced is by checking the fluid. Automotive experts recommend checking the fluid level and condition every month regardless of whether you are experiencing problems or not. You can find many detailed tutorials online about how to check the fluid but I will give you a quick synopsis about how it is done.
The process goes something like this. For most makes and models the car needs to be running in order to get accurate results. Usually the car is taken for a drive in order to warm up the engine and fluids. Transmission fluid actually expands quite a bit when it is warmed up so checking the fluid while the car is cold can have misleading results. Once the car is warmed up it should be put in park or neutral on a level surface and then the hood needs to be popped. Most cars have a fluid dipstick near the transmission; you can find where it is located in the owner manual. After you have found the dipstick you will want to remove it and wipe it on a clear paper towel or a rag of some kind. This will be where the color and condition is inspected. Normally fluid should be a bright, clear red. A dark red or light brown are okay colors if the fluid has been used for some time but darker colors can mean it needs to be serviced, especially if it is a dark brown. Colors closer to black may mean that your transmission has a problem. Also if the fluid smells burnt then this can also mean that it has problems. If there are metal shavings or large particles floating about then that may mean that the filter has failed to do its job or it may mean bigger problems. To check whether the fluid has oxidized wipe some of it on a paper towel, if it does not spread then this means it has oxidized. If the fluid shows any of those symptoms - dark colors such as brown or black, a burnt smell, large particles or metal shavings, or fluid oxidation -- then it means your car needs to be taken in to be serviced. If everything seems okay then at this point you will want to check the fluid levels. Simply re-insert the dipstick after wiping it down and then remove it again. The fluid should be somewhere between the two marks. If it is below the second mark then you will want to add the specified transmission fluid suggested in the owner manual in small quantities, checking periodically until the levels reach in between the two marks.
If you stay on top of maintenance procedures then your car will last much longer than average. It is vital to take care of your car unless you want to face expensive repairs or the purchase of an entirely new car later on. Be sure to properly maintain your car on a regular basis because it works tirelessly for you, the least you can do is to keep it in good running condition.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/8033331

Sunday, November 9, 2014

How to Easily Check Your Wiper Blades

It's just one of those things I suppose. It always seems to be something you can put off for another day until you get time...Maybe on the weekend!!.
When it comes to checking over your windshield wiper blades, which of course is something we all do once a week at least, (yeah right) we certainly pay special attention to the most important section of our wiper blades don't we?
I can almost see that blank look on your face from here you know!
This is the problem we all run into with windscreen wipers, where a quick look to see how they are going basically just shows us they are a rubber strip thing which is generally black.
As far as anything else goes, what are we supposed to be looking at that will tell us if they are safe or in decent condition?
And here is the information you need then.
As you know, your windshield wiper system is made up of a couple of metal arms that each hold a sprung metal shoe that clips on to a thin rubber compound blade that sits on top of your windshield.
As your wiper motor is turned on, the arm is oscillated in a manner that allows each arm to drag the rubber wiper blade up the screen and then in reverse it tips the blade the other way and drags it down again. The importance of this drag action is to ensure that the real working part of each blade is the part that operates on your windshield for best streak-free cleaning.
If you look closely at these rubber blades, you need to focus on the lower edge of the blade-part specifically, as this is 99% where your wiper blades either work well or let you down.
Firstly, wiper blades are made from a rubber or silicon compound in order that they don't scratch your windshield during use. So they shouldn't scratch, squeak, shudder or streak.
However, the long bottom edge of the rubber blade itself is actually made with a square cut less than 1mm wide, with clean square 'sharp' corners. As these sharp lengths are dragged at about 45 degrees across the windscreen they quite efficiently scrape away the dirty rain, mud, grit and other road debris that constantly plates your windshield every day, regardless of the weather.
What this debris and soil does is very quickly wear away the sharp edges of your wiper blades and also scratch your windshield itself if not cleaned away by using decent blades and periodic fresh water flushing. Obviously as these edges become ever more rounded they do a better job of smearing your windshield and scratching your glass to provide headlight glare.
So, this is the part you are supposed to be monitoring at least weekly, as well as paying regular attention to the metal (sometimes plastic) shoes and the metal arms to ensure they are rust free.
Of course, although nobody likes the thought of spending upwards of $25 for a set of new blades, both finding them and then physically changing over the old set are probably even more daunting jobs anyway. Of course we all know that wiper blades are designed not to come off cars once they have been in place for a week, aren't they?
However, a little bit of technology is all that is required and the entire trauma of changing over your windscreen wipers can be avoided for as long as a couple of years if you keep an eye on them and treat them well. Then you can have them changed for you during a service.
Weekly I would suggest you wash your windscreen and wiper blades with a mild detergent and fresh water. This will better extend the life of your blades anyway and provide far better value from what you purchase. It will also help your screen remain less scratched.
However, if you really want to save yourself a fortune, help the ecology with around 6 times less waste and save yourself a ton of work and stress changing your wiper blades over, then you need to take a quick look at the link shown below.
Personally I have only ever purchased 3 sets of new blades in more than 40 years of driving, so just think of the cash, ecology value, effort and frustrations benefited.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4033123

Monday, November 3, 2014

Oil Change Delay Consequences

First off, an oil change is a procedure that is required for the engine to function well and last longer. All engines require some sort of lubricant or substance that will facilitate better movement in order for it not to have friction and not to generate too much heat. The lubricant is also necessary to minimize the scratching that should occur when there is no smooth, liquid surface that metal to metal surfaces encounter.
After the purchase of a brand new car, the owner is instructed to come back after a certain amount of mileage has been reached or a certain span of time has passed. The reason for this is so that the distributor of the vehicle can do the oil change procedure on the engine and to check on everything.
The procedure basically gets the engine used to the work that it will encounter once it is used. People drive to work, do the grocery, pick up their kids and go for long drives every day, or most of the time. The work that the engine will go through will continue for several years.
Whether we like it or not, the engine will always have metallic residue that will eventually shave off through the continuous movement and friction that occurs in it. Little metal residue or shavings, as well as some burnt oil, will eventually accumulate in the lubricant and darken it. This makes it more viscous and thicker than what it originally was. Thicker oil will not move as freely as it would if it were less viscous. A thick lubricant does not function well and can generate heat. This will overheat the engine, potentially causing it to explode in the worst case scenario, or just crack it when it is too hot already. A cracked or broken engine cannot be fixed anymore. Accidents can happen if the engine stalls or quits in the middle of the road. Oil may drip from the engine and cause large enough spills that can cause slicks on the road.
Factors that Delay
There are several reasonable factors that can delay the changing of the lubricant. Among these, the cost of the procedure can be daunting if the filter is to be changed as well. The cost is actually fairly small especially if you think about what you can save when it comes to repairing the engine due to the damages that happens when it malfunctions due to unchanged lubricants. Another factor that can delay the oil change is the lack of time. People are usually very busy and they often postpone the changing service until the very last minute or up until they sense something is wrong with the engine already. A busy schedule will be even busier if there is no vehicle to bring the owner to and from places.
Another reason for delaying an oil change is ignorance. There is no better word for this type of negligence than ignorance. Many people these days buy vehicles but lack the experience or skill to maintain them. People often have no idea that they need to actually have the car serviced for the changing of the lubricant as well as for other things that help to keep it in good running condition.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5660490

Friday, October 31, 2014

Signs That Your Car Needs A Tune Up

Hard Starting: This is the most common form of car trouble. It's usually due to some unperformed maintenance. If the starter cranks the engine, the electrical system is probably okay. The culprit could be a starting sensor (on fuel injected models) or the choke mechanism (on engines with carburetors). Frequently, starting failure can be traced to an electronic component or a computer controlling the ignition system.
Knocking: The noise generally is heard when the engine is under load, such as when accelerating or climbing a hill. While it often may be caused by a thankful of interior gas, ignition knock frequently is a sign your engine needs attention. It also can be caused by a buildup of carbon inside the engine. Lake-model cars are equipped with a knock sensor which 'hears' the sound and makes corrective adjustments. But it cannot compensate for a severe malfunction, a condition that can affect engine performance and even damage the engine.
Stalling: This can be caused by incorrect speed adjustments, a malfunctioning sensor or switch, dirty fuel-system parts, worn spark plugs, or other engine deficiencies. Does it stall when hot? Cold? With air conditioning on? To make diagnosis easier, make note of when it happens and advise your technician.
Power Loss: How long since the fuel filter was changed? A dirty filter is a common cause of power loss. As noted under "poor gas mileage", there can be many causes of this condition, most of which can be located with a diagnostic procedure.
Poor Gas Mileage: By keeping a regular check of gas mileage (miles driven divided by gallons used); you can tell if your engine is losing efficiency. Increased gas consumption may be accompanied by other symptoms listed in this section. Note that poor gas mileage also may be due to: under inflated tires, engine running too cold, transmission malfunction, dragging brakes, misaligned wheels.
Dieseling: This also is known as "after-run". The engine keeps chugging and coughing for several seconds after the ignition is shut off. Causes can range from inferior gas to excessive idle speed. Carbon in the combustion chamber also may cause dieseling.
Exhaust Odor: The smell of rotten eggs comes from the catalytic converter, part of your car's emissions-control system. The odor can be due to an engine problem or it can be a sign that your car's catalytic converter is malfunctioning.
Rough Running: A malfunction in either the fuel or ignition system can cause an engine to run rough. It also can be due to an internal engine condition, such as a bad valve or piston. Does it occur when idling? When accelerating? At all speeds? Your best bet: have a qualified technician perform diagnostic and tune-up services as needed.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/903077

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Friday, October 17, 2014

Fluids That Cars Use

Keeping the different fluids in your car clean and full, is part of your basic car maintenance that you don't want to neglect. By keeping your car well-maintained you can help prevent breakdowns or future problems. It's not uncommon to see an engine go well over 200,000 miles if it has been properly maintained. If you don't know where to find the fluids in your car you can always refer to your owner's manual to find them, and see what maintenance is required.
Here are the different fluids your car uses. It's also important to know what these fluids look like so you can identify them if you have a leak.
Engine Oil (Dark amber or brownish color) - The motor oil in your car keeps all the engine parts working and lubricated, without this oil your engine would seize up and stop running. Check your engine oil at least once a month and make sure it is filled to the mark on the oil dipstick. Make sure you put the proper type oil in your car by checking with your owner's manual.
Power Steering Fluid (Goes in clear but turns darker with usage and age) - This keeps your car turning easily and effortlessly.
Automatic Transmission Fluid (Usually a reddish or pinkish color) - This important reddish, fluid allows your car to move backwards and forwards easily and smoothly by shifting gears while you drive. A manual transmission may use several different fluids. Check your owner's manual to make sure you are using the right fluid.
Brake Fluid (Goes in clear but turns amber with usage) - There is a reservoir for the master cylinder up on the firewall of the engine compartment where you can check the level of fluid. Keep it up to the full mark. The brake fluid allows you to stop your car. Without brake fluid you literally have no brakes.
Engine Coolant or Anti-freeze (Florescent-colored green or orange liquid) - Keeps the cylinder heads and engine block cool so your engine doesn't overheat and seize up.
Rear End Oil (Dark amber or brownish color) - This allows your drive axle to turn freely and smoothly.
Windshield Washer Fluid (Usually a blue color) - Used to help keep your windshield clean and streak free for good visibility.
It is important to maintain the proper levels of fluids in your car for safe operation and in preventing trouble down the road. If you notice any signs of these oils or fluids on your garage floor they need your immediate attention before causing serious problems and damage.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6271104

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Hot Shot's Secret Tune-Up-Trio, featured in a "food truck"



Matt and Bruno are at it again, servicing a food truck that is participating in the The Worlds Largest Food Truck Rally in Tampa, FL.

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Family Owned!

Nor Cal Performance is a family owned full-service auto repair shop in West Sacramento, California. We offer comprehensive automotive maintenance and repair for all foreign and domestic vehicles. 

As a certified NAPA AutoCare Center, we take pride in offering our customers quality auto repair at a fair price. 

Our ASE Certified Technicians are well trained and highly skilled in the repair of your car, truck, SUV, or van, no matter what the problem may be. We also offer fleet maintenance and repair, brakes, oil change, tune up, transmission, electrical, alignment, diagnostics, and much more.



We are also a STAR certified test and repair smog station.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Different Fluids Cars Use

Keeping the different fluids in your car clean and full, is part of your basic car maintenance that you don't want to neglect. By keeping your car well-maintained you can help prevent breakdowns or future problems. It's not uncommon to see an engine go well over 200,000 miles if it has been properly maintained. If you don't know where to find the fluids in your car you can always refer to your owner's manual to find them, and see what maintenance is required.
Here are the different fluids your car uses. It's also important to know what these fluids look like so you can identify them if you have a leak.
Engine Oil (Dark amber or brownish color) - The motor oil in your car keeps all the engine parts working and lubricated, without this oil your engine would seize up and stop running. Check your engine oil at least once a month and make sure it is filled to the mark on the oil dipstick. Make sure you put the proper type oil in your car by checking with your owner's manual.
Power Steering Fluid (Goes in clear but turns darker with usage and age) - This keeps your car turning easily and effortlessly.
Automatic Transmission Fluid (Usually a reddish or pinkish color) - This important reddish, fluid allows your car to move backwards and forwards easily and smoothly by shifting gears while you drive. A manual transmission may use several different fluids. Check your owner's manual to make sure you are using the right fluid.
Brake Fluid (Goes in clear but turns amber with usage) - There is a reservoir for the master cylinder up on the firewall of the engine compartment where you can check the level of fluid. Keep it up to the full mark. The brake fluid allows you to stop your car. Without brake fluid you literally have no brakes.
Engine Coolant or Anti-freeze (Florescent-colored green or orange liquid) - Keeps the cylinder heads and engine block cool so your engine doesn't overheat and seize up.
Rear End Oil (Dark amber or brownish color) - This allows your drive axle to turn freely and smoothly.
Windshield Washer Fluid (Usually a blue color) - Used to help keep your windshield clean and streak free for good visibility.
It is important to maintain the proper levels of fluids in your car for safe operation and in preventing trouble down the road. If you notice any signs of these oils or fluids on your garage floor they need your immediate attention before causing serious problems and damage.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6271104

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

How to Safely Jump Start Your Car



Jump starting a car appears to be a simple process. Today's vehicles, however, have computers and sensors that can easily be damaged if procedures aren't followed. This video will help your through the process, which will protect you and your vehicle from harm.

Saturday, September 6, 2014

5 Basic Checks Before Replacing a Catalytic Converter



Do you think you need to replace a catalytic converter? Learn what tests need to be performed to save money, save time and maintain the best converter efficiency. This video will also inform you of what you need to do to reduce your chances of repeat emission control failures

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Questions To Ask Your Shop


· Are you affiliated with the automotive service association?
Only shops with a consistent record of excellent service may affiliate with the Automotive Service Association. Look for an ASA sticker or seal in the mechanic's office. Association with ASA is a sign that the shop provides really high quality service.
· Do you have an Automotive Service Excellence certificate?
This is another sign of quality service. ASE workers do evaluations of vehicle repair shops. Shops that conform to the ASE standards are given a certificate. A certificate signifies that the shop's work is approved and of great quality.
· What are your credentials?
You want technicians that have been trained at trade school. Trained technicians are more knowledgeable and skilled. Sometimes shops will have untrained rookies work on cars.
· Does your shop specialize in any particular type of car?
Certain mechanics specialize in certain vehicles or repair work. Find out what the shop's strengths and weaknesses are.
· Do you charge an inspection fee?
Do not assume that the shop has a free estimate. You don't want any surprise charges later.
· What did you do to my car?
Ask for a detailed explanation of the repairs done. Question every single detail of the job. Also ask for a detailed breakdown on your invoice of the repairs done. This will protect you from getting scammed. Ideally, you should ask the mechanic to point out each of the repairs on your car. Ask the mechanic to discuss what was removed, replaced, or repaired. You should also ask to see the old part.
· Do I get a courtesy car?
If the repair will take a long time, you may be eligible for a courtesy car. Always ask for a courtesy car. Don't forget to ask for the cost. Sometimes repair shops will charge large amounts for a rental car.
· What are your payment policies?
Each repair shop has different labor rates and payment options. Ask your mechanic about the payment policies. You want to know exactly how much you will be paying for a repair.
· Do you offer any guarantees?
When you get your car fixed, you want to know that the repair is guaranteed. Make sure there is a warranty on the repair. You also need to know long the warranty is. If you have any issues with repairs shortly after, you will want the repair shop to cover the additional fixing costs. The warranty on your repairs is incredibly important.
These questions will help you find a great mechanic. These questions will also make sure you are getting the best possible repair service. Mechanics are necessary for proper car maintenance. You want to be able to find a great one you can rely on.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7571183

Friday, August 29, 2014

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Diesel VS Gas Engines


Whether you're thinking about buying a diesel car or truck or becoming a diesel mechanic or simply would like to compare a diesel powered vehicle to a more conventional unleaded gasoline powered vehicle, there are a few things you need to bear in mind and understand. Each type of engine has its own advantages and drawbacks, so knowing what you need and how you need it for your personalized lifestyle is really important.

Today's diesel engines are certainly not what they have been 10 or even five years back. Gone are the days of pungent exhaust and unacceptably obnoxious engine sound. Diesel engines have become much cleaner, have more power and are considerably more dependable. These are some of the reasons that we are seeing more and more ordinary automobiles with diesel engines rather than the traditional gasoline engine.

Let's take a look at various differences between these two engine types.

Are the Engines of Diesel Trucks and Cars Better?

Theoretically, a diesel truck engine is quite similar to the engine of a truck powered by gas. They are both internal combustion engines that are designed to transform one type of energy to another type of energy. This energy then results in linear motion, which then causes forward motion to take place. The major difference is how the combustion takes place. A gas truck engine has fuel combustion come about thanks to sparks from spark plugs. A diesel truck engine has the fuel combustion take place from the heat of the pressurized air within the engine.

Safety of the Engine

As any diesel mechanic will tell you, although you can flame diesel fuel in the open air using merely a wick, it is significantly less explosive than gas and does not develop a flammable vapor. That means a diesel engine won't ever vapor lock. Moreover, a diesel mechanic will tell you that the engines in diesel trucks will be more efficient because of their fuel efficiency, which is practically constant as compared to the sporadic nature of a gasoline engine which often can use more fuel to get less power.

Engine Performance

As any diesel mechanic will explain, what makes a car so appealing is its ability to accelerate swiftly. For that reason, we need to evaluate the performance difference between both engine types. Because engines in diesel trucks and cars are focused on torque as opposed to horsepower, they'll run more efficiently but accelerate fairly slowly in comparison. For many automobile owners, that lack of acceleration is unsatisfactory. For motorists who are looking to use their car or truck for pulling heavy loads such as campers or boats, a diesel engine makes more sense.

Efficiency of the Engine

When you compare a diesel engine to a gasoline engine, we cannot overlook the efficiency between both engines. If you are looking for an engine that's going to be used long-term, then a diesel engine is going to be best for your needs because you will save money over the lifespan of the engine. With 20 - 30% less fuel consumption, the savings really can add up. Diesel engines also have a longer lifespan than their gasoline counterparts. A typical diesel engine lasts around 350,000 miles before needing an overhaul, the gasoline counterpart is good for about 120,000 miles. Should you be looking for short term benefits, however, then a gasoline engine will likely be for you since it will take a few years for a gasoline engine to be less cost effective overall than a diesel engine.

Ultimately the environmental advantage of using a diesel engine is what shifts the debate in favor of using it primarily. The engines of diesel trucks and automobiles produce only a minimal quantity of carbon monoxide, so minimal, actually, that they can be used underground. Less carbon monoxide impact on our atmosphere means a healthier planet, and that's something we should all be striving toward.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6788465

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Monday, July 28, 2014

Look Inside a Diesel Engine with Hot Shot's Secret



Mile after mile, the injectors in your diesel power your performance on the road. The injectors are under extreme pressure, up to 35,000 PSI, which efficiently atomizes fuel, providing a cleaner burn for more power. But high pressure leads to high temperatures, which burns the oil inside your injector. The oil changes into a gummy, sticky residue coating the internals and creating friction. That sticky friction is called "stiction". Your injectors with stiction can't deliver optimum performance. First a decrease in turbo boost, then loss of power and hard starts. Your oil pressure drops; you experience hesitation, idling, and excessive black smoke. Your lifetime fuel mileage decreases. Severe cases of stiction are often misdiagnosed as "failed" injectors.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Hot Shot's Secret Tune-Up-Trio, featured in a "food truck"



Matt and Bruno are at it again, servicing a food truck that is participating in the The Worlds Largest Food Truck Rally in Tampa, FL.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Oil Changes Are Important!

We hear it from our parents when we first get our license. Mechanics put little stickers as a reminder on our windshield. Over and over we're nagged to get our oil changed. But why does everyone insist it's so important? This article will hopefully give you those answers and get you onboard with getting your car's oil changed regularly.
What is an oil change for, exactly?
Simply put, oil is used in cars to lubricate the instruments. The lubrication is important to prevent friction, especially since our engines are designed with elements rubbing against each other to create energy. Because the engine demands so much use from the oil, eventually the chemical construction of the motor oil breaks down and can no longer provide lubrication. Without the lubrication, engine parts are rubbing directly against each other, the results of which can cause severe damage and, ultimately, stop working altogether. Therefore, old, less effective oil needs to be drained and new, fresh oil needs to be added to ensure proper lubrication.
Small bucks to save big bucks
On average, an oil change will cost between twenty and thirty dollars (sometimes less if you find a promotion). This pricing is for conventional oil, not synthetic oil. Synthetic motor oil will most likely be double the price, but that's because it's a higher performing oil. You can refer to your owner's manual or ask the mechanic which type is right for your car, but as long as you are keeping up on your oil changes, conventional oil is generally fine. For that twenty to thirty dollars spent now, you will be saving your engine from enormously costly repair down the line. Think of it as preventative medicine for your car. Plus, most mechanics will include other life-extending services along with your oil change such as tire pressure checks, hose inspections and transmission fluid top-offs.
The price may go up if you need to replace your oil filter, or if during your overall inspection your mechanic suggestions a new air filter, hose, transmission fluid, etc. At this point you may feel upselling pressure. Certainly, there are mechanics who are out to make money. So it's important to find a mechanic you can trust. In most cases when add-ons are suggested, it's for the health of your car so you won't be back in a few months time being towed because your hose burst on the highway or your engine stopped because the air filter was too dirty to let air flow through.
One other oil change bonus to save you money: you'll save gas mileage! New oil is slick and will easily allow the movement of engine parts. Older oil gets gummy, causing the engine to work harder to perform. And when the engine works harder, it must burn more fuel.
How often do I change the oil?
There is no absolute answer to that question. The average suggestion is every three to five thousand miles. Factors can alter that estimate. For one, synthetic oil has a longer lifespan than conventional oil (it's chemically engineered to not gum up as quickly, especially in extreme temperatures) allowing more time between oil changes. Also, if you spend a lot of time in heavy stop-and-go city traffic, you are causing more of a strain on your engine and may need an oil change sooner. Your mechanic will give you their best estimate of when to come back, and will usually put a reminder sticker on your driver's side windshield. The reminder will often say to return either when you've reached a certain mileage, or in approximately three months. Since an oil change is basically the cost of dinner for two, even if you happen to be returning a bit earlier than your car needs with that estimate, you're only helping the health of your engine in the long run.
Hopefully you've now added to your list of necessary tasks (along with dentist appointments, pet's vaccines and oven cleaning) regular oil changes for your vehicles. Be proud of yourself for staying ahead of potential costly repairs to your engine. 


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7195765

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Things To Ask Your Mechanic


· Are you affiliated with the automotive service association?
Only shops with a consistent record of excellent service may affiliate with the Automotive Service Association. Look for an ASA sticker or seal in the mechanic's office. Association with ASA is a sign that the shop provides really high quality service.
· Do you have an Automotive Service Excellence certificate?
This is another sign of quality service. ASE workers do evaluations of vehicle repair shops. Shops that conform to the ASE standards are given a certificate. A certificate signifies that the shop's work is approved and of great quality.
· What are your credentials?
You want technicians that have been trained at trade school. Trained technicians are more knowledgeable and skilled. Sometimes shops will have untrained rookies work on cars.
· Does your shop specialize in any particular type of car?
Certain mechanics specialize in certain vehicles or repair work. Find out what the shop's strengths and weaknesses are.
· Do you charge an inspection fee?
Do not assume that the shop has a free estimate. You don't want any surprise charges later.
· What did you do to my car?
Ask for a detailed explanation of the repairs done. Question every single detail of the job. Also ask for a detailed breakdown on your invoice of the repairs done. This will protect you from getting scammed. Ideally, you should ask the mechanic to point out each of the repairs on your car. Ask the mechanic to discuss what was removed, replaced, or repaired. You should also ask to see the old part.
· Do I get a courtesy car?
If the repair will take a long time, you may be eligible for a courtesy car. Always ask for a courtesy car. Don't forget to ask for the cost. Sometimes repair shops will charge large amounts for a rental car.
· What are your payment policies?
Each repair shop has different labor rates and payment options. Ask your mechanic about the payment policies. You want to know exactly how much you will be paying for a repair.
· Do you offer any guarantees?
When you get your car fixed, you want to know that the repair is guaranteed. Make sure there is a warranty on the repair. You also need to know long the warranty is. If you have any issues with repairs shortly after, you will want the repair shop to cover the additional fixing costs. The warranty on your repairs is incredibly important.
These questions will help you find a great mechanic. These questions will also make sure you are getting the best possible repair service. Mechanics are necessary for proper car maintenance. You want to be able to find a great one you can rely on.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7571183

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Fleet Services Help Keep Your Vehicles On The Road

Nor Cal Performance provides professional repair and service for automotive fleets. We understand your busy schedule and need to get your vehicles back on the road as quick as possible with great service. Here is a list of services we offer our fleet users:

  • Priority Service
  • Reduced Maintenance Costs
  • Credit and Billing Program for Approved Accounts
  • LeasePlan USA fleet management vendor.
  • 12/12 Warranty on Parts and Labor
  • Computerized Service History for each Vehicle
  • ASE Master, and Factory Trained Technicians, to Repair Your Vehicle Quickly and Effectively
  • Latest and Most Advanced Diagnostic Equipment
  • Oil Change reminders
    •  

    We are qualified to repair diesel engines from a variety of manufacturers, including,
    Ford Powerstroke, Chevrolet Duramax, RAM Cummins, and Isuzu NPR and others.

    Nor Cal Performance
     provides professional fleet service repair on all American European and Japanese small cars to medium duty trucks

    Wednesday, July 9, 2014

    5 Tips To Passing Your Smog Check


    You receive your DMV notice in the mail and it's that dreaded time again. Thank God, it only happens once every 2 years but it still can be quite a daunting task. Getting that Smog registration form in the mail can be pretty nerve racking, especially with today's strict environment standards and poor economy. Failing your smog check is no joke too because it often results in expensive repairs, dirty shops and hidden fees and upsells.
    Although, I cannot fix your car, I can give you tips on how I got my smog check done in as little as 30 minutes, without having a heart attack.
    1) Research - First things first, you have to do your research. If you don't, you'll end up going to the wrong shop that can play you like a fiddle. I like to go to yelp to find the top restaurants, dry cleaners, and yes smog shops in my city. If you are in San Francisco, I personally recommend Clean Air Smog. Ive been there three times already and I cannot agree more with the over 100+ 5 star reviews on their place.
    2) Call To Set An Appointment - You would be surprised at how many friends I talk to that say they waited 3 hours to get their smog check. Simple solution, set an appointment and you'll be in and out in 15 minutes. (Bonus: look for a shop that has 2 smog machines and usually, you'll get done a lot quicker.)
    3) MapQuest - Don't get lost and miss your appointment. MapQuest it so that you will get their prompt and on time.
    4) Bring Your Favorite Mag - You will have to wait for your car to be smogged. Make sure you keep yourself entertained.
    5) Drive Your Car - Don't lag, get in your car and head over to the car smog station.


    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2976446

    Thursday, July 3, 2014

    How to Have a Safe and Fun 4th of July



    For a lot of kids, fireworks are the highlight of a Fourth of July celebration. Unfortunately, firecrackers often lead to Independence Day accidents for many children and adults. Even the popular sparklers can be a safety hazard for a child. In this episode of Gear Daddy, Daddy Troy introduces some safe alternatives to fire works, including glow in the dark toys that parents can give to their kids.

    Friday, June 27, 2014

    Tuesday, June 24, 2014

    Saturday, June 21, 2014

    Keep Kids And Pets Safe In Summer Heat!



    Never leave your child or pet unsupervised in a vehicle, even for a minute. Temperatures inside a car, even on a mild and sunny day, can rise 20 degrees in just 10 minutes. A 72 degree day can turn deadly for children, who are particularly susceptible to heatstroke because their bodies can heat up five times faster than adults.

    Monday, June 9, 2014

    Friday, June 6, 2014

    Is Your Vehicle Steamed at You?

    How much to you know about your vehicle radiator and what it does to keep you cool? First of all, your radiator is located at the front of the engine right behind the grill. The radiator is a type of heat exchanger designed to transfer heat from the hot coolant that flows through it to the air blown through it by the fan. Most modern cars use aluminum radiators. The coolant flows from the inlet to the outlet through many tubes mounted in a parallel arrangement that make up the body of the radiator.
    Since the engine works harder than most of the other auto parts, it has a tendency to overheat; therefore, it needs a cooling system that would keep it operating at the right temperature. Even under normal conditions the engine produces an enormous amount of heat. The work of the cooling system is to remove at least one-third of that heat in the combustion chamber so the engine won't overheat. The radiator is the device in the cooling system that dispels the heat absorbed by the anti-freeze or coolant mixture from the engine. It has tubes that hold a large amount of water-coolant mixture and passages that provide large areas in contact with the air outside the vehicle. Water is mixed with the coolant and is circulated around the engine through the cylinder block and head. In the process the water/coolant absorbs the heat from the engine and its parts. The water/coolant is then pumped from the engine towards the receiving tank at the top of the radiator. It spreads over the tops of the tubes and passes through them, thereby, losing its heat to the air which passes around outside the tubes. After getting cool in the radiator, the water/coolant goes back to the engine to absorb heat again and the cooling process continues as long as the engine is running. Without some way to cool off, your engine would turn into a block of useless metal in no time at all.
    Most people know the green stuff in the radiator keeps the engine from turning into a block of ice in the winter, but it also helps keep things cool in the summer. Radiator coolant actually raises the boiling point of the water, allowing it to carry more heat away from the engine and that means a cooler running engine. If you are running low on coolant, things can get steamy hot fast. It only takes a second to check your coolant level. Most cars have an opaque coolant overflow tank right next to the radiator. There are markings on the side indicating low and high levels of coolant. Always check your coolant level when the car is cold. If the level is low, it's time to top it off. The engine takes a 50/50 mix of coolant and water. You can measure and mix it yourself or you can buy the premixed coolant that is simply ready to pour.
    According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, cooling system failure is the leading cause of mechanical breakdowns on the highway. Coolant neglect is one of the leading causes of cooling system breakdowns. Most vehicles will lose a little coolant over time due to evaporation from the reservoir. But a significant loss of coolant in a relatively short period of time usually signals a leak, a radiator cap that isn't holding pressure, or a cooling system that is running too hot. It's a good idea to visually inspect the radiator, water pump, hoses, and freeze plugs as well as the rest of the cooling system for external leaks. Hoses that have white streaks on them may be indicating leaks. If no leaks are found, the loss of coolant may be due to long term neglect or a temporary episode of overheating.
    Checking the strength of the coolant to determine the concentration of antifreeze in the coolant is just as important for hot weather driving as it is for cold weather. A 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water will provide boiling protection up to about 255 degrees and freezing protection down to -34 degrees. Increasing the concentration of antifreeze in the coolant will raise its boiling temperature and lower its freezing point. The maximum concentration however, should be limited to 65% to 70% because too much antifreeze and not enough water reduces the coolants ability to carry heat - which increases the risk of overheating in hot weather.
    Something else to keep in mind is that there are two main antifreezes available, EG (ethylene glycol) and PG (propylene glycol). These have slightly different specific gravities or densities, it is important to be sure the correct type is being used. The main difference between these two is the additive packages. To reduce confusion, several antifreeze suppliers like Peak and Prestone are now selling a universal type of antifreeze that is compatible with all types of antifreeze and all makes and models of vehicles. Some argue this is not entirely true, but the universal type seems to work okay and is widely accepted in the aftermarket. It is important however, to not mix types of antifreeze. If you are adding or changing coolant, it is best to follow the recommendations found in the owner's manual and use the same type of coolant that was in the system.
    While coolant is usually the culprit in many radiator problems, there are other things that can go wrong or can plug up the whole works. Radiator problems often start slowly due to clogging from rust and debris. This reduces the radiator's ability to transfer heat and it reduces the effectiveness of the cooling system too. A clean radiator is a cool running radiator. For maintenance, your radiator requires a flush, usually once a year. This flush will clean out the rust and other debris that could create a problem. Remember, dealing with your radiator when your car is running or still warm from running is dangerous due to very hot liquid. Allow your car to cool completely before removing the cap or otherwise touching the radiator.
    As with any vehicle maintenance, your radiator maintenance should be up to date and done on schedule. Forgetting or letting it slide till next year might cause you far more headache and cost than simply doing it on time. It's much easier to do the maintenance than to replace the entire radiator or engine of your vehicle. You don't want to be left sitting on the side of the road while your engine takes a steam bath.


    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4921467